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Can little Aussie food companies really take the world by storm?

Posted by on Mar 21, 2017 in Export | 0 comments

Can little Aussie food companies really take the world by storm?

There has been a lot of talk about Australia becoming the “food bowl” of Asia over the last few years and the trade statistics indicate that Australia’s trade with the rest of the world in food products continues to increase. Take for example, wine sales, which increased in value by 11% in 2016, reflecting increasing demand for premium Australian wines in most key markets around the world, particularly Northeast Asia and North America. But what does this mean for the small end of the market? Are there opportunities for micro-medium sized local companies that only sell domestically? And if there are, how do you access them? The great news is that if you’re an Australian food producer, the blue-sky opportunities are pretty much all overseas. Whereas the major supermarket chains will only ever pay producers the very lowest price that they can get away with, international markets are screaming for Australian food and willing to pay top dollar for it. Here are three quick case studies which demonstrate that. To find out whether your little Aussie food company has the potential to take the world by storm, join our webinar and hear Founder of SuperSprout, Melinda Richards talk about launching her food company on the global stage.   Sugar Free delivers a sweet surprise Melinda Mackay started Sugar Free Solutions in 2005 because she wanted to make sure her son, newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could have cake at his next birthday. “We found it very difficult to offer him the normal “treats”, since very limited sugar free products were available in Australia”, says Melinda. “This created a drive and passion to provide our son and other diabetics, as well as those who wish to eradicate sugar from their diets, a variety of quality sugar free baking mix products”. Melinda began experimenting with sugar-free cakes, and using a natural plant-based sweetener. When word of her creations began to spread, she realised the scope of the market for them. It was not long before she began exploring exporting her sugar-free mixes to countries with a high level of diabetes. Today, Sugar Free Solutions is exporting sugar-free cake and muffin mixes to the Middle East and Asia.   The humble hot chip goes to Pakistan In June 2006, Gary Katos, a chef, fast food business operator and consultant opened Cone Heads restaurant in Melbourne. His concept was simple – to offer healthier versions of classic take-away food, especially hot chips and gourmet burgers. Fast forward to 2014 when Katos franchised the concept and opened his first international store … in Lahore, Pakistan’s cultural and food capital. Not your usual first international market for a food business. Cone Heads Pakistan prides itself on being different to the big US fast food brands – a premium product that is suitable for all ages and easy to eat on the go. The company has built a strong business in Australia by perfecting its recipes and creating efficient store operations. It has taken this same approach in Pakistan. To establish its presence in Pakistan, Cone Heads made some cultural adjustments to its menu to suit the local palate, such as providing spicier sauces made from local ingredients, using more chicken than beef, and extending the range of burgers from the five it offers in...

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Attention SMEs: The “next big thing” for your company is probably overseas!

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in China, Indonesia, International Business, International Market Entry, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States | 0 comments

Attention SMEs: The “next big thing” for your company is probably overseas!

As an SME leader, your top priority is to grow your company. You understand that building a pipeline of work, securing recurring revenue and scaling your business depends upon identifying opportunities and being prepared to capitalise on them. What you may not have realised is that the “next big thing” for your company that once in a lifetime opportunity, is probably waiting for you somewhere offshore. In fact, there has never been a better time for Australian SMEs to look abroad, particularly in the services sector. International travel is less expensive than ever before. Technology has made it possible to meet clients, employees and partners in the comfort of your own office and to sell goods and services overseas without ever leaving your own city. Record low interest rates are supporting economic activity and the low Australian dollar is making it easier than ever to export Australian goods and services. Australia’s trade agreements with the United States, Singapore, New Zealand, Thailand, China, Japan and South Korea are also reducing barriers to exports of goods and services. Nonetheless, less than 10% of Australian SMEs are exporting or operating offshore? What’s going on? Lack of awareness is one key problem and lack of expertise is another. Many companies are unaware of the size of the opportunities on offer and many others know that opportunities exist, but don’t know what they look like or how to capitalise on them. Dearin & Associates’ international networks and dealings in-market mean that we are plugged into broader demand trends as well as specific requests from stakeholders for Australian goods and services. We’ve also worked with and come across some of Australian business’ biggest international success stories. So we know that right now, in a number of the key markets that we work in, governments, industry players and consumers need what Australian companies (even micro-businesses) have to offer. If you’re looking for an overseas opportunity to seize, here are some markets hungry for your product, and some examples of how other Australian companies have successfully built their business through international expansion. United States – Something for everyone … especially in services Trump may be in the White House, but that doesn’t mean that America’s vast and vibrant economy has come to  a standstill. You could launch pretty much any kind of business in the US and have a reasonable chance of success, even if you’re small. Queensland jeweller, Margot McKinney is one great example of a small Australian business who has taken the States by storm. Operating from Fortitude Valley, Queensland, McKinney launched into the US market a decade ago, and her designs are now sold across the country and worn by Hollywood icons, including Dita von Teese. There is also almost limitless potential in the US services sector in areas as diverse as online marketing, pet care (Americans spend more than $40 billion each year on their pets), e-commerce, mobile and social gaming, restaurants, environmental consulting, aged care, transport and logistics and private security. United Kingdom – Technology, high value manufacturing and services Even though the UK market is mature in many respects, there are still a truckload of opportunities on offer and available niches to fill. The high-value manufacturing and technology sectors are both going strong, but you don’t have to be a tech...

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How to Build Trusting Relationships in Indonesia?

Posted by on Feb 17, 2017 in Business, Cross-cultural Management, Trade | 0 comments

How to Build Trusting Relationships in Indonesia?

The first encounter with your potential business partners in Indonesia has become a positive experience for you. The delegation team of your company has met the General Manager as well as the members of the Management Board. While having dinner together in an exclusive restaurant in Jakarta you introduced each other by talking about your work but also a lot about your private life. Now, your team would like to process the project and get down to business – the reason you came here. But please, hold on for a moment! The most common mistake business people from Western countries make in Indonesia is that they want to get down to business negotiations too quickly. In European countries or in Australia people usually do not spend much time in getting to know each other when establishing business with new partner companies. They come for presenting their products and talk about numbers and specifications. This is the way people from Western countries build up trust: They show their achievements and present the quality of their products. In Indonesia, however, people built up trust in a more emotional way. Before talking about business numbers they feel the need to get to know their potential partners closer and to build up a good and stabile relationship first. While sitting together during your welcome dinner you might have felt already that they show a high interest in your personal life. They asked you about your family and your hobbies and many more personal things. With that Indonesians are not just curious (like often considered by Westerners) but rather try to collect information about you that show how reliable and trustworthy you are. This happens also in view of future projects: In a country where written contracts are considered more a formality than an obligation they need to estimate your behaviour in case something goes wrong. Only if they rate somebody as trustworthy, Indonesians will pay efforts building up a business relationship and allow to move the negotiations onto the next level. Therefore be aware of the fact that your behaviour, your ability to respond to your guests and the image of your character play a significant role in your business negotiations. What type of personality is considered trustworthy? Across the archipelago, Indonesians are known to be quite relaxed people although in business. They are very friendly and courteous and usually smile a lot. With that they intend to create a comfortable atmosphere where everybody feels convenient. For foreign business people therefore it is advisable to be generally open and friendly. Again – giving insights into your life in Australia, your hobbies and your family contributes much to create a good image and to contribute to the positive atmosphere. As many foreign business people report, making business with Indonesians often feels like making business with friends. Not least, Indonesians see it that way. Despite their easygoingness, however, Indonesians are also very polite people. There is a popular saying that sometimes even is written at the doors of offices or restaurants, “Santai tapi sopan” meaning “Be relaxed but polite” which is quite self-explanatory. Not least because of that they also expect you to show a polite and respectful behaviour – no matter how stressful a situation might be. And since many things take their time...

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How to Get Started in Indonesia

Posted by on Jan 10, 2017 in Business, Indonesia, Trade | 0 comments

How to Get Started in Indonesia

a A cultural guide for business people Welcome to our mini-series of How to Get Started in Indonesia. In the next couple of months we’ll introduce basic cultural knowledge about doing business in Indonesia through a number articles. This article outlines the very first encounter with Indonesian business partners. Handshake & Small Talk: Meeting Indonesian Business People Your company has decided to start doing business in Indonesia, and you have established contact with an Indonesian company that has made you a very interesting offer. You are about to fly to Jakarta and want to meet your potential business partners in person, get an idea how their company is like, and possibly sign the deal. Although Indonesia is your geographical neighbour, Indonesian culture is quite different from the Australian. So what do you need to know about business culture in Indonesia to accomplish a successful first encounter? Who will be part of your company´s business delegation? It’s worth mentioning that you must be prepared before your departure to Indonesia. In that part of the world, the status and the corporate position of a person are very important. In other words, big jobs are done by big people. Establishing business with somebody from a foreign country is a big job, no matter how large the deal actually is. Therefore, many top managers consider it a sign of respect to welcome their international guests in person. By assembling your delegation team you should also pay attention to the people´s titles and positions. If you know that the Indonesian General Manager will await you for the first meeting, the team you’re sending should also hold top positions in your company. A simple handshake with a big difference When we meet people for the first time, whether Australian, Indonesian or European, we always try to create a positive image of ourselves. You may think that shaking hands can´t be tricky but when dealing with different cultures, even little things can make a difference, especially when it comes to everyday customs. For instance, the greeting ritual. Many who are unaware of cultural differences drop a brick on the stage of global business and unintentionally put themselves in fragile situations. In the Indonesian business world, the welcoming part follows a hierarchical approach where top managers must be greeted first. Some people greet with a soft handshake while smiling and making eye contact. This might not be acceptable in Indonesia, as it contains the world’s largest Muslim population. Some Muslim businesswomen politely refuse to shake hands with men. When this happens, you must greet with a little nod while folding your palms just the way Asians do.  Business cards are not just cards Just like the western world, exchanging business cards is a ritual that follows the first handshake. In addition to company and contact information, business people in Indonesia use business cards as an important source of identifying seniority. Indonesian workers care for the title and the corporate position mentioned, as it reveals their qualifications and gives them an idea about how to deal with that person. In Indonesia you may offer your business cards using both your hands, however, you must receive business cards exclusively with your right hand. When received, by reading it thoroughly and placing it in your wallet, you are showing a sign of appreciation and respect that is highly valued in the Indonesian culture. Fiddling with it,...

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Colombia: An Economic Miracle

Posted by on Dec 19, 2016 in Agribusiness, Business, Colombia, Economy, Economy, International Business, Investment, Medellin, Trade | 0 comments

Colombia: An Economic Miracle

To most people Colombia continues to be an unknown quantity, a country which has done its violent image few favours in the past. However the country’s well publicised peace process and move to end a stubborn insurgency against FARC rebels has dominated the media and optimism has surrounded the country’s political environment. Economic Miracle What few people in the Australian business community realise is that Colombia has been experiencing an economic miracle in the past decade. The overall macro figures and overall key gauges paint a positive picture for the country’s long-term outlook. Between 2005 and 2016 the average annual growth rate was 4.3% and it outpaced its neighbours to become Latin America’s fourth largest economy. This is also reflected in the country’s capital markets which are valued at $93.49bn and moved to become the fourth biggest market in Latin America behind traditional heavyweights Brazil, Mexico and Chile. Colombia’s credit rating has also seen strengthening during this time, with Standard & Poor including it in the BBB club. “We raised our long-term foreign currency rating because of the strengthening pillars underpinning Colombia’s economy, which have reduced its vulnerability to external shocks and enhanced its capacity for stable long-term GDP growth “ -Standard & Poor This growth and positive general outlook can be explained by successive Colombian governments who have shown a commitment to free trade and an open and transparent business environment. In 2013 the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) invited Colombia to begin the process of accession into the OECD. The consensus is that if reforms continue at their current pace then Colombia will be only the second South American country to join the organisation by 2017. This represents a massive turnaround for a country which was on the verge of becoming a failed state in the 80’s. Business Friendly Environment Sustained economic reform has also made Colombia one of the friendliest and easiest places in the world to do business. It is the third most business-friendly country in Latin America and first in the region for investor protection. The country’s strategic geographical location, with access to both the Pacific and Atlantic makes it one of the most unique in the continent in that aspect. The Santos government has started to leverage its access to the Pacific by building more ports in key corridors and by opening pathways for Colombian goods to reach Asian-Pacific markets. It is also a core member state of the Pacific Alliance and its aim is to continue opening trade links through the Pacific. The Pacific Alliance means that Colombia is now connected to 45 countries and 1.5 billion consumers, including the United States, Europe, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Medellin: World’s Most Innovative City Recently ACI Medellin, an agency promoting investment in Colombia, have been touring Australian cities with the aim of promoting the city of Medellin to Australian investors. A lot can be said about this innovative and thriving hub which now markets itself as the continent’s start-up capital. In fact it was awarded the title of ‘Most Innovative City’ in 2013 beating traditional heavyweights Tel Aviv and New York for the title. A large part of this innovation is the city’s a strong commitment to education with over 41 higher education providers in the metropolitan area. Main Industries...

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East Mediterranean Gas: Navigating Success in Choppy Waters

Posted by on Dec 6, 2016 in Business, Egypt | 0 comments

East Mediterranean Gas: Navigating Success in Choppy Waters

The waters of the eastern Mediterranean Sea have proven some of the most fruitful for international companies exploring for natural gas in the past decade or so.  There have been a string of large gas discoveries offshore Egypt, Cyprus and Israel.  The most recent of these discoveries was the giant Zohr field offshore Egypt in mid 2015 by the Italian company ENI.  The Zohr discovery shows that there may still be a great deal of gas yet to find in a region which has a long history of gas production.  Egypt has been producing gas from this region for decades.  The Zohr field proves that a deeper stratum of rock is gas bearing after several previous drilling attempts were unsuccessful.  ENI is making swift progress developing the field with first gas expected before the end of 2017. Israel announces bid round for 24 blocks There are still pathways to access these opportunities from bid rounds and buying into existing projects.  Israel announced on 15 November a bid round for 24 blocks offshore.  This is a rare opportunity: a significant number of concessions on offer in gas-prone waters in an OECD country.  In 2009 and 2010, the US company Noble Energy and its Israeli partner Delek found extensive gas resources in the area.  The Tamar field started production in 2013 but the Leviathan field has yet to achieve a final investment decisions it has become beset by regulatory delays.  The same partnership followed its success with a major discovery offshore Cyprus, the Aphrodite field. But past problems may put some off  The Israeli government is likely to pay careful attention to courting Australian oil and gas companies in order to overcome past failed efforts.  In 2014, Noble and Delek negotiated with Woodside to take a stake in the Leviathan project in order to use its considerable LNG experience.  The negotiations broke down after six months as Woodside were not able to ensure stable investment conditions and the risk of political interference was too great.  This caused considerable embarrassment to the Israeli government who are anxious to repair the damage to the country’s reputation as an investment destination.  The other significant driver behind the government’s bid round is to encourage own entrants into the sector to reduce the dominant position that Noble and Delek enjoy.  Controversy over Noble and Delek’s potential abuse of its position has been behind much of the delay to Leviathan. Meanwhile the outlook in Egypt is looking up In Egypt, ENI is reported to be ready to sell a 40% share in the Zohr field having just completed the sale of a 10% share in Zohr to BP.  The Egyptian state-owned gas company EGAS also holds regular bid rounds for acreage with the next likely to be launched in the first half of 2017.  The outlook for the natural gas sector in Egypt has improved in recent weeks.  The government has introduced far reaching economic reforms that should resolve some of the key issues facing foreign investors in the natural gas sector, particularly the payment arrears.  The government has allowed the currency to float freely and has reformed energy product prices.  These reforms along with the injection of finance from the IMF and other institutions should go a long way to resolving the shortage of hard currency in the country and the government’s credit issues. And the region is well placed to serve local and European markets The availability of such gas resources is only a commercial opportunity if...

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The UAE: No Longer a Cultural Desert

Posted by on Oct 20, 2016 in Arab World, Business, International Business, United Arab Emirates | 0 comments

The UAE: No Longer a Cultural Desert

     On a recent visit to Abu Dhabi and Dubai, I was surprised by the opportunities in the cultural and creative industries. I watched my first Abu Dhabi-made film and heard talk about the imminent opening of the Etihad Museum in Dubai and the Louvre in Abu Dhabi.  The Guggenheim is also planning a museum in Abu Dhabi.  In August this year, the 2000-seat Dubai Opera opened.  The venue will host a variety of performances, not just opera and ballet. The governments of Abu Dhabi and Dubai are funding this investment in culture and the arts. The long standing rivalry between the two largest emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates (UAE) leads to one-upmanship. Dubai plans to open its Etihad Museum (a name meaning “union” and usually associated with Abu Dhabi) on national day, 2 December, beating Abu Dhabi to the first ribbon cutting.  Louvre Abu Dhabi is set to open in 2017.   There is a more serious intent behind this cultural flowering on the edge of the Arabian desert.  Both cities want to maintain their attraction as tourist destinations and compete with more established cultural centres.  Authorities in both cities have recognised the need to offer more than landmark hotels, golf courses, beaches and shopping malls. Surveys of visitors to Dubai have highlighted the demand for cultural attractions to enhance a stay in the city. Dubai has planned for an opera house and museum for a decade but plans were put on hold by the financial crash. In the case of Abu Dhabi, there is also the need to diversify away from an oil-based economy. In the past, there has also been a nervousness about encouraging the arts, especially imported Western arts, due to the challenge to traditional values from such factors as expression of radical ideas through to men and women mixing in public.   This clash between cultural imports and tradition is the main theme in the Abu Dhabi-produced film I saw during my visit. Abdullah was financed by the Abu Dhabi government, stars Abu Dhabi actors and was produced and directed by Abu Dhabi citizens. Abdullah, a native of Abu Dhabi (played by Abu Dhabi actor Mohammed Ahmed) is growing up in a traditional household where his father’s word is law.  Abdullah starts a love affair with music. In his youth, Abdullah turns to the traditional Arab instrument the lute-like oud but his efforts to master it lead to confrontation.  After giving up on a dead end job, he flees the family home and moves into a flat accompanied by a piano and portraits of European composers.  While ostensibly a personal journey, there is no hiding the political message of the film.  As Abdullah struggles to earn a living as a film score composer in a society which remains wary of such foreign cultural imports as Western classical music and film, he discovers that the national anthem tune was written by a foreigner.  He battles to persuade “The Ministry” to adopt his composition or even to allow it to be played in public.  Abdullah is a cautious exploration of tensions in Abu Dhabi society: young Emiratis fretting at the need to conform to tradition, the perceived threat to those traditions from foreign culture and the reliance of Abu Dhabi on foreign expertise....

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A ‘new NATO’? – Consequences of Turkey’s attempted coup d’état

Posted by on Sep 15, 2016 in International Affairs, Iran, Russia, Turkey | 0 comments

A ‘new NATO’? – Consequences of Turkey’s attempted coup d’état

One fateful night On the evening of July 15, 2016, a military coup d’état was instigated in Turkey against the Turkish government and institutions by a minority within the Turkish military, calling themselves the Peace at Home Council. The putschists seized control of the state-run television, announced the imposition of a curfew and martial law while also closing two bridges in Istanbul to Europe and Anatolia. The President and leader of the Justice and Development Party (AKP), Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, was on holiday at the time but urged his supporters to the streets using FaceTime and, somewhat ironically, the independent broadcasters. Twelve hours after the first signs of the military coup, Erdoğan went on air announcing that the government was in control and the coup had failed. Figures stand at roughly 300 killed and 2,100 injured. It was suppressed, isn’t it now just business as usual? No. The scale of political insurrection and subsequent government reaction in Turkey is incredibly rare for an Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country, albeit not so in comparison to many of its neighbours. The economic landscape in Turkey is facing significant uncertainty given the military and political transformation resulting from the allegations being made. Nearly 82,000 civil servants have been sacked or suspended for alleged links to the coup attempt or those involved. What next – pivot from the EU to the East There is the serious possibility of a major pivot by Turkey away from NATO and Europe towards the East as relations sour with the United States (US), making Russia a relatively more attractive ally. This tension has risen partly because the US has refused requests for the extradition of Fethullah Gülen, of the eponymous Gülen movement, who Erdoğan alleges were the coup architects. The Turkish strongman has made it clear that the US must choose between Turkey and the Gülenists. Furthermore, we have already seen warming relations and cooperation between Turkey and Iran. Mevlut Cavusoglu, Turkey’s Foreign Minister, recently met with his Iranian counterpart, Mohammad Javad Zarif, at a joint news conference. The pair promised closer contact and greater cooperation on their involvement in Syria, critical given their opposing viewsof Bashar al-Assad’s future. This pivot towards the East, and namely Russia, has long term relevance not only due to Turkey and Russia being at the forefront of military operations in the Middle East, but because their combined populations and economies constitute a major proportion of Europe’s total. Turkey has long been an aspiring member of the European Union (EU) but recent developments over the past years have brought this into question. The events of July 15 and the associated fallout may represent the tipping point for Turkish foreign policy. Turkey, Iran and Russia… the ‘new NATO’? NATO has long been the primary deal and peace-maker in Europe and more recently the Middle East. However, a ‘new NATO’ comprising Turkey, Iran and Russia, and any other countries that see fit to join the rank and file, would increase their ability to project policy beyond national borders. Erdoğan has claimed that he is; “even more determined to work hand-in-hand with Iran and Russia to resolve regional issues and to strengthen our efforts to return peace and stability to the region,” A fairly clear cut direction regarding Turkey’s future foreign policy....

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Indonesia: Why Australian business should be knocking on the door of our northern neighbour

Posted by on Jul 18, 2016 in Business Strategy, Cross-cultural Management, Indonesia, International Market Entry, International Trade & Development, Market Intelligence | 0 comments

Indonesia: Why Australian business should be knocking on the door of our northern neighbour

Over the years, Indonesia has gained a not entirely unfounded reputation as a difficult place to do business. Australian and other foreign businesses often report that protectionist trade policy, red-tape and legislative uncertainty have plagued their attempts to enter the market. In recent years Australia’s economic engagement with Indonesia has been further limited by a complicated diplomatic relationship. The result is that trade and investment opportunities between the two countries have been severely undervalued, with Australian-Indonesian two-way trade at $8 billion dollars less than that between Australia and New-Zealand.   Indonesia is the world’s 16th largest economy, Australia’s second-closest neighbour and has a burgeoning middle class. These factors and the huge economic potential they create have existed for some time – so why should Australian businesses start taking note now? Australia should stand up and pay attention, because currently these forces are converging with a historical shift in Indonesia’s approach to foreign investment, to generate a plethora of economic opportunities. Part of the reason for this shift is that government in Indonesia has traditionally been dominated by ethnic Malays, while ethnic Chinese have long been the “business brains” of the country. However, recently a notable change in generational attitudes to ethnic divisions has seen more ethnic Chinese entering the public sector and political realm, bringing with them their well-honed commercial acumen and business nous.  The appointment in August 2015 of Trade Minister Thomas Lembong exemplifies this trend. A Harvard educated investment banker of Chinese descent whose wife and children reside in Singapore; the new Trade Minister is emblematic of the growing influence that business-minded ethnic Chinese are gaining in the Indonesian government. With this, a ‘sense of urgency’ has come to characterise the mood of Indonesian economic policy as the fall in commodities prices threatens growth and the ‘most reformist government’ in 15 years under President Joko Widodo, drives progress towards a more diversified economy.   As part of this diversification the Indonesian government is making leaps and bounds in addressing key obstacles to foreign investment. Examples of reform include the new foreign investment Negative List which has opened up key industries previously off-limits for investors including energy, oil and gas and transport and a new ‘one-stop shop’ set up by the Indonesia Investment Co-ordinating Board (BKPM) for obtaining government approvals. The government has also issued strong signals that initiatives are in the pipeline to address legislative uncertainty and bureaucratic complexity. These reforms are a work in progress, but the point that any Australian business looking to internationalize should note, is that which Trade Minister Lembong, recently highlighted: ‘The trend is your friend. And if you wait until it’s all rosy and beautiful, it’s too late by then.’ Opportunities exist now, specifically in those sectors in which Australia specializes, precisely because the Indonesian economy is developing. A 45 million-strong middle class, set to grow to 135 million by 2020, according to McKinsey, is hungrily demanding services, a sector which at present makes up 70 percent of the Australian economy. The de-regulation and massive expansion of infrastructure underway in Indonesia as well as the development of the tech sector are other key growth areas that Australian businesses should be tapping into. The Australian government has recognised this potential and has, as of March 2016, recommenced negotiations on the Indonesia Australia...

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Doing Business in Indonesia: Beyond Nasi Goreng

Posted by on Jul 4, 2016 in Business, Cross-cultural Management, Export, International Market Entry, Trade | 0 comments

Doing Business in Indonesia: Beyond Nasi Goreng

Entering any market without a depth of commercial intelligence and clear strategy is risky business. In a market like Indonesia where challenges such as bureaucratic procedures, high levels of regulation and a largely informal business culture can have significant impacts on the success of new ventures, such an approach is akin to a shot in the dark. Dearin & Associates’ introductory webinar, Doing Business in Indonesia: Beyond Nasi Goreng, is your first step to engaging the huge potential of Indonesia’s developing market. Indonesia is the world’s 16th largest economy, and Australia’s closest neighbour, and while in the past its trade policy has been dominated by a form of soft-protectionism, now, emphasis has shifted towards liberalisation. The days of red-tape and regulatory complications undermining foreign investor confidence are also being left behind and many doors open up for new opportunities in this diverse, dynamic market. Equipped with the right knowledge, your business can benefit from the unequalled opportunity in Indonesia. Drawing on rich experience and a diverse network across the Indonesian cultural, legislative and economic fields, Dearin & Associates’ Indonesia experts, Barnaby Caddy and Lydia Santoso will guide you through the opportunities and challenges of Indonesia’s market and strategies for expanding your business there. Webinar topics include: Overview of the Indonesian economy Opportunities and demands across various sectors How does your business align with the immense opportunities in Indonesia’s economy? What do Indonesian business partners expect from foreign business and what is the government’s role? Strategies for entering the Indonesian market in your sector Cross-cultural tips for interacting with Indonesian stakeholders Join us on Wednesday, July 27 at 4:00 PM Sydney Time to learn about the exciting opportunities on offer to expand your business to Indonesia by clicking the link below: JOIN THE...

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